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IGUASSU

FALLS

Perhaps the largest remaining area of Atlantic forest, which mainly occurs in Brazil, is inland at Iguazu Falls. The national parks on the Brazilian (Iguaçu) and Argentine (Iguazú) sides of the mighty Iguazu River and falls total over 550,000 acres of sub-tropical rainforest. With the added year-round humidity created by the crashing water at the falls, the forests are especially rich in vegetation and the accompanying fauna.

 

The impressive series of falls rank as one of the most spectacular settings on the continent. Thousands of people come here each year to see the spectacular falls, yet the national parks on both sides remain almost undiscovered as a wildlife viewing destination. Their luxurious sub-tropical rain forests constitute one of South America's finest areas for seeing mammals such as Little and Red Brocket Deer, South American Coati, White-eared Opossum, and a sub-species of the Brown Capuchin. Also occurring but harder to see are Jaguar, Ocelot, Jaguarundi, Puma, Margay, White-lipped Peccary, Bush Dog and Southern River Otter. The endangered Tegu Lizard is common, and the number of butterflies one can see is astounding.

 

The two parks are a top bird watching destination as well. Fortunately, and unfortunately, both the Argentine and Brazilian parks have finally established mass transit systems to control car traffic in the two parks. At the same time however, they greatly restricted access into the parks before 800am, and cut visitation to regions not on the normal visitor routes. This has greatly hurt our ability to offer you birding tours here, but it is still worthwhile for birds seen outside of the park, and around the falls.  There are some lodges that are great for seeing the birds of the region, bordering the park.

 

Whether Iguazu Falls is your main destination or just part of a larger tour, it will certainly be a favorite, and shouldn't be missed! Two full days are recommended.

 

Perhaps the largest remaining area of Atlantic forest, which mainly occurs in Brazil, is inland at Iguazu Falls. The national parks on the Brazilian (Iguaçu) and Argentine (Iguazú) sides of the mighty Iguazú River and falls total over 550,000 acres of sub-tropical rainforest. With the added year-round humidity created by the crashing water at the falls, the forests are especially rich in vegetation and the accompanying fauna.

 

The impressive series of falls rank as one of the most spectacular settings on the continent. Thousands of people come here each year to see the spectacular falls, yet the national parks on both sides remain almost undiscovered as a wildlife viewing destination. Their luxurious sub-tropical rain forests constitute one of South America's finest areas for seeing mammals such as Little and Red Brocket Deer, South American Coati, White-eared Opossum, and a sub-species of the Brown Capuchin. Also occurring but harder to see are Jaguar, Ocelot, Jaguarundi, Puma, Margay, White-lipped Peccary, Bush Dog and Southern River Otter. The endangered Tegu Lizard is common, and the number of butterflies one can see is astounding.

Whether Iguazu Falls is your main destination or just part of a larger tour, it will certainly be a favorite, and shouldn't be missed! Two full days are recommended.

Iguassu Falls
Rain forests, wildlife & spectacular waterfalls